Climate Change

Climate Change

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Project Slide
Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Project Slide
Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Project Slide
Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Project Artist Name
Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Project Artist Description

Life is different now. Warmer ocean temperatures have prompted bleaching events of the world’s coral reef communities. Healthy colorful coral have changed into weakened ghostly white coral, susceptible to disease and death. Coral bleaching events are visual cues of thermal stress caused by global warming, serving as the “canary in the coal mine” and warning us of serious environmental consequences.


These abstract figurative sculptures powered with outdoor energy efficient LED lights are a call for the reversal of global warming. Three-dimensional wall sculptures and hanging illuminated sculpture remind us that beneath the deep blue sea, a world of environmental change is occurring. We are all accessories and responsible for this environmental crime. The world cannot wait decades for cutting edge researchers, corporations, government, and institutions to implement change. We must bring clean energy solutions out to market sooner. We must adapt for environmental change. We must create new tools that keep the problem from getting worse. Disruptive environmental approaches will create a future for humankind. I am optimistic.

Joan Takayama-Ogawa’s(Ceramics at Otis College of Art and Design; MA, Stanford University; BA, UCLA) ceramics are in the permanent collections of the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; deYoung Museum Fine Arts Museum; World Ceramic Exposition Foundation; Princessehof Leeuwarden Nationaal Keramiek Museum; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Oakland Museum of California; Long Beach Museum of Art; American Museum of Ceramic Art; Racine Art Museum; Neward Museum of Art; George Ohr Museum; Hallmark Collection; and Celestial Seasoning Tea Company. Takayama-Ogawa is a Professor in Product Design at Otis College of Art and Design. She served as a Pasadena Design Commissioner, and the Board of Directors, American Museum of Ceramic Art.
 

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